The wild yam plant is a twirling vine with knotty, woody, cylindrical and pale-brown colored tubers. Its tubers are warped and have branches horizontally. Its thin reddish stem grows to more than 9 meters in lenght. This plant has groups of flowers colored greenish-white or greenish-yellow. Its heart-shaped leaves are smooth on the top and feathery underneath.

wild yam

Wild yam contains chemical diosgenin. In the laboratories, this chemical can be processed into steroids like estrogen and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA).

What Is Wild Yam Good For?

In ancient times, wild yam was used for relieving colic and rheumatism, as well as a remedy to deal with pain. Yup, with its properties to relieve spasm and inflammation, wild yam is used to treat symptoms of arthritis, rheumatism and for treating muscular pain and cramps.

It's also used to treat gastrointestinal complaints like inflammation in the gallbladder, diverticulitis and IBS or irritable bowel syndrome. Wild yam is also a good option for urinary tract infection due to the combination of its anti-inflammatory and diuretic effect.

Like it's said above, diosgenin, a chemical compound, is present in the wild yam plant. This is used in steroid hormones and birth control pills. It supports the concept that this helps regulate female sex hormones associated with menopause and the symptoms that comes with it.

The plant is a natural alternative to estrogen therapy, for estrogen replacement therapy, vaginal dryness, PMS, menstrual cramps, osteoporosis, boosting sexual energy for both male and female, and also to stimulate the enlargement of female breasts.

Wild yam is also known to decrease blood pressure and cholesterol levels. And it has shown great benefits for the health of your spleens, stomach, kidneys and lungs.

Where To Buy Wild Yam?

Looking to buy wild yam, Amazon has a good selection of wild yam pills, tablets, creams, oils and extracts. I've listed some of them below, hoping to help you find what you're looking for.

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Photo by Wendell Smith | Creative Commons